A Dream in the Making for Twitter’s Revenue Stream?

Today TechCrunch published an article about the dilemma Twitter may be facing in deciding its functional and accepted revenue stream model.

But if I recall correctly, didn’t Twitter hire a business manager a few months ago, whose aim might have been to develop their revenue stream model? What has he been working on thus far? I don’t foresee any other revenue models for Twitter other than placing paid ads within the tweets.

I don’t think there is a single user who would want to pay a subscription fee to follow some celebrities, no matter who may that be, unless a few fanatical users. Also, charging a fee for business accounts, as was reported on several blogs, may not even work since differentiating between a business and a non business account may be a daunting task.

Thus, the only option I see for Twitter’s revenue stream model is to place paid ads within the tweets or on the right side bar within the trend topics. Anything different may be detrimental to the explosive growth of Twitter.

Advertisements

Making the Best Out of the Worst, Especially Right Now

Someone once told me that the start is always the easiest but is the end that counts the most. So, whatever it is that you are doing, people will always appreciate how you start, but will always remember how you finish.

Well, for me, it’s been a long journey trying to find my pitch, my niche, and I believe I found it now. Since August 2008, I’ve embarked on a project that seemed nearly impossible, in a crowded market economy. But I’ve always believed in myself, and the power of being creative, to find the best out of the worst, even when most of us may seem to be out of luck due to our current economy. But I believe the best is yet to come. I think I can truly say so, because being an economics student here at OSU, and in Spring 2010, I hope to start my PhD program in Economics, I strongly believe that our economy will turn around sooner than we think, and no matter where you are or whatever you are doing, you can make the best out of anything, especially right now.

I am a strong believer, always have been. I believe that each and every one of us have certain God given, unalienable gifts and talents, and it’s up to each and everyone of us to go all the way and explore how to maximize our potential in order to make our dreams come true.

In August 2008, my team and I started working on my new project, Welated (www.welated.com), and it seemed almost impossible making it and developing it to become an actual, viable entity with an actual business model that doesn’t just depend on paid ads like other social networking sites, and I have to say that, with God’s help, I think finally made it happen. Welated is now done, fully functional, and I am very excited about it. We started testing it on January 2009, under a certain code name, and over 8,000 people signed up within just two months, and that was amazing.

We’re now migrating the site from the testing alpha to beta mode, it is a combination of Facebook, MySpace, and Hi5.com, all in one. We combined all the cool tools you’ll find on most of your favorite social networking sites and place them in one easy-to-use Welated platform.

However, Welated has a creative twist to it, that’s, instead of simply offering traditional social networking tools, Welated offers an innovative platform that allows users to keep track of what their lovers are doing at any given time. That’s, a Welated user can instantly know if her or his wife/husband/boyfriend/girlfriend is being unfaithful and more, anywhere. I purposely founded Welated to help people learn more about each other’s dating history, interests, and activities, so that no one can ever say; I wish I only knew.

Please, take some time and check out Welated at www.welated.com, sign up, it’s free, and take a tour of the site, experiment with the tools on the site, and please let me know what you think. You can always delete your account at any time if you decide not to stay registered, and feel free to search for my name on the site and connect with me.

Feel free to Welated me at; http://www.welated.com/profile.php?user=simon

Latest Update: GoDaddy.com’s Shady and Unethical Domain Names’ Renewal Process

The following is my latest update on my two previous posts regarding GoDaddy.com’s possible unethical European domain name expiration and renewal procedures.

Since my last update here, I have had numerous email exchanges with an executive from GoDaddy.com, trying to amicably negotiate with GoDaddy.com in regard to their European domain name unethical expiration, renewal, and cancellation procedure. And, after numerous email exchanges, GoDaddy.com finally agreed to give me back, two of my domain names, Rentersq.co.uk, and Tipmart.co.uk, by renewing them for additional two years at no cost to me. But there are other .DE domain names that I have lost because of their renewal procedure.

The way GoDaddy.com registers and manages European domain names, such as .co.uk, .de, etc., it’s like having a retail store that you own and manage, and your livelihood depends on your retail store’s revenue. However, your retail store’s landlord, who after you’ve signed a one-year lease, always comes to your store, once a year, at least 60 – 90 days before the end of your lease agreement, asking you to pay for the lease term, and if you decide to wait until the actual due date of your lease agreement, then your landlord instantly locks up your retail store, closes it down, and redirects your customers to the landlord’s store elsewhere, leaving you to lose business as your customers are redirected elsewhere.

And, that’s exactly how GoDaddy.com operates when coming to registering and managing the European domain names as I have it explained here. Also, you may want to read here what other customers are saying about similar problem with GoDaddy.com.

I have written to GoDaddy.com several times, but with no amicable solution. And some of my requests are for GoDaddy;

– To instantly change its policies and procedures for its European domain names’ expiration procedures, invoicing and renewal process, and not to ever redirect expiring domain names for any customer to the GoDaddy’s parking pages with paid advertisement.

– To stop cancelling domain names from its customers account prior to the actual expiration dates.

– To adopt similar industry domain name expiration and renewal standard such as that of Yahoo! Domains’ expiration and renewal procedure, that GoDaddy must only cancel any domain name from any user’s account only after the actual expiration due date. And if for any reason whatsoever, that GoDaddy.com is unable to do so, then it must stop registering European domain names, directly or indirectly.

– Not to deactivate, cancel and then forward or redirect any expiring or expired domain names for any customer to any of the GoDaddy’s parking page with or without any paid and or sponsored advertisement.

– To publicly announce, by whatever form of written public announcement, such as a press release or posting on GoDaddy’s official blog, that GoDaddy.com has agreed to make changes to GoDaddy’s Universal Terms of Services in regard to its expiration, invoicing, and renewal procedures for the European Domain Names, and that GoDaddy will no longer cancel and redirect expiring or expired domain names to GoDaddy’s parking pages with paid or sponsored advertisement.

– To offer a discount price of $9.99 per each European Domain name for any and all of GoDaddy’s past and current customers, who may want to purchase any new European domain name through GoDaddy.com.

I have a long list and I am still collecting names of those, anyone, past or current customer of GoDaddy.com, who have been affected by GoDaddy.com’s European Domain Names’ expiration and renewal procedure as explained above for a possible class action against GoDaddy.com. So, please get in touch with me the soonest.

Latest Update: GoDaddy.com’s Shady and Unethical Domain Names’ Renewal Process

I recently wrote about how unhappy I am about GoDaddy.com’s possibly shady and unethical domain name expiration procedure. And, today, I received an email from someone ,named, Alon, from The Office of the President at GoDaddy.com, who wants to talk to me about my concern.

The following is the email copy I received from him;

Go Daddy – concerns about domain expiration procedures

Friday, January 2, 2009 3:38 PM

From: “**********@godaddy.com” *************@godaddy.com

To: simon@rentersq.com

Dear Mr. Kapenda,

I recently came across an article you posted to your blog regarding Go Daddy’s domain name expiration procedures:

https://princesimon.wordpress.com/2008/12/30/godaddycoms-shady-and-unethical-domain-names-renewal-process/

Specifically, you stated that Go Daddy parks domain names approximately 40 days prior to expiration if not renewed. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to speak with you about your concerns because I can assure you that Go Daddy does not normally do this. I’d like to learn more about your experience to see if anything occurred that should not have or if there is simply some confusion that needs to be cleared up.

If you can find a moment, please contact me by phone at your earliest convenience. Of course, I’d be happy to call you, if you’d prefer; just provide a phone number and let me know when would be a good time to call. If you’re unable to speak by phone, please respond via email and let me know at least one domain name that you believe was handled this way so that I can investigate.

If you have any other concerns or questions, please also feel free to contact me.

Regards,

Alon
Twitter: GoDaddy*****
G*********@GoDaddy.com
Office of the President, GoDaddy.com
10am – 7pm, US Mountain Standard Time
(480) 505-8828 Phone
(480) 275-3975 Fax

I emailed him back, telling him that I will call him early next week.

I appreciate the fact that GoDaddy contacted me the soonest I posted that blog. I give them credit for that, but the fact is, I am not happy how they do business when coming to their domain name expiration procedure.

My request is for GoDaddy to change the way they do business, in regard to their expiration processing procedure, because it’s not just hurting me, it’s probably hurting everyone who registers domain names with GoDaddy.com.

I will keep posting here any and all the updates on this subject matter.

Example of one my domains that are expiring soon, and have already been forwarded to GoDaddy’s parking page with paid ads, is Tipmart.co.uk (www.tipmart.co.uk). This domain expires on January 9, 2009, but since mid November 2008, this domain has been redirected from my web site; Tipmart.com, to GoDaddy’s parking page. I have had several domain names, including .com’s, which GoDaddy has done the same thing, and I have lost several of them as explained in my previous post.

Stumble It!

Ramamia – the Simplest New Way to Privately Share Photos, Web sites, and Events with Families

In my LinkedIn network of connections, there’s a 16-year old Mark Bao, an incredible talented serial entrepreneur but still a high school junior student, whom I met about two years ago on YoungEntrepreneur.com, and ever since, I have come to admire him for his ingenuity and ambition.

He’s the real definition of entrepreneur. He has started several Internet and web application companies and now serves as President and CEO of Avecora.

Recently, Mark Bao and his partner, Jason L. Baptiste, launched a new site, Ramamia, which makes it seamlessly simple for anyone to privately share photos, events, messages, and videos with every family member and friends. I tried it out today, and I found the site to be one of the most eye-appeasing, user-friendly, the site color is great, the user-interface and navigational tools are well positioned; so easy even your grandma can use the site and find her way around.

A gazillion number of new sites is launched every day, most of them are useless and doomed to fail on their first launch, including some of mine, but Ramamia is a unique site that offers a cool breath of fresh air for online social networking, geared for families and friends.

But, don’t just take my word for it, go and try it out for yourself. The site’s sign up process is very simple; all you need to sign up as a new member is to simply enter your last name. No long process of entering tons of mumbo jumbo personal details to register and start using the site. Also, adding your family members to your Ramamia Family Profile is as simple as ABC, and uploading your photos and videos, or creating your events and sharing them among your family and friends are tirelessly simple.

It was recently reported around the web that most social networking sites including Facebook are trying to simplify their signup process for new members. Even last week, Facebook attempted to quietly launch their new sign-up form, which they temporarily flashed on their homepage, with a new user is only required to enter his or her full name to sign up. Ramamia has beaten Facebook to the punch in implementing their easy sign-up process, and this is the same method I am going to implement on my new site, Welated, due to launch by March 2009.

Ramamia is currently angel-funded, but I am not sure yet what is their primary revenue model, perhaps is solely based on paid ads, but the site states that they will soon launch their premium version. The entire Ramamia site is unique, great, I like the site color, and its user-interface is phenomenal.

The only fault I found with the site, is that they don’t use Usernames and Passwords for registered users to login, but at the time of registering with the site, it sends you a nasty long and tedious link to your email, which you have to remember or bookmark in order to login. However, if they can fix their login process, Ramamia is definitely deemed to exponentially grow, as families around the world try to find the easiest and simplest way to share events, photos, and videos online. Ramamia is the new Facebook of families.

Notice: I have no affiliation with Ramamia nor do I have investment interest in Ramamia.

Webware Finally Credits TechCrunch

I recently wrote on here about Webware kind of living in the shadow of TechCrunch on nearly every story they report. But, the good news thereafter is that Webware seems to have heeded my writing, that today in their Daily Tidbits, they finally credited TechCrunch on their report that, “Charles River Ventures, a venture capital fund that focuses on Web start-ups, and is trying to find a hot company through Facebook”.

It’s good to see Webware finally crediting TechCrunch on their tech news reporting, because for a while now, all they have been doing is report on whatever TechCrunch reports without at times crediting TechCrunch, and that was kind of boring and annoying, not to say, lack of news reporting and creativity.

Speaking of Facebook hot Apps, I am working to launch, Wrisen, which is poised to be one of today and tomorrow’s hot and fast growing social apps on Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, Hi5 and other social networking properties.

Due to launch in January 2009, Wrisen is poised to be the emotional comforting social application for everyone including pets anywhere, but with an actual revenue business model, and is not mostly depended on sometimes under-performing social revenue ads.

Is Webware Walking in the Shadow of TechCrunch?

Every hour of each day, other than CNN.com, BBC News, Yahoo News, and the New York Times, I have to peek at TechCrunch and then Webware to get my hourly up-to-the-minute news on any new and upcoming technology and web companies.

However, for the longest now, TechCrunch and Webware have been more like, following each other on what each one reports, with TechCrunch always leading the way, while Webware seems to only peek at what TechCrunch has to report and then they come up with the same news reporting on the same subject.

I am not saying that Webware plagiarizes TechCrunch, but it gets really boring to have the two tech news venues that I have come to like and admire always reporting on the same subject, different written style but on the same topic. TechCrunch will have a story on a certain subject and then an hour or a day later, Webware will have a story on the same subject that TechCrunch has just previously reported.

Have the tech news stories suddenly become so rare that Webware always seems to be walking under the shadow of TechCrunch?