The Biggest Events of 2008 the World Community Has Ignored

1. The Darfur Crisis – thousands of civilians, women and children, are suffering and most are dying each day, from violence, diseases, and hunger, but no one wants to do anything. The UN seems to have stalled, powerless, or simply doesn’t care anymore, or never cared in the first place. Does China still threaten to veto any UN resolution which could help end the Darfur crisis?

2. The Zimbabwe Crisis – the world community has been barking but not biting at the Zimbabwean government to end the crisis. They want African governments to force Mugabe out of the office, but the fact is this; since Zimbabwe gained independence in 1980 from Britain, Mugabe and his government acted as the guardian and pillar of other African neighboring countries, such as South Africa and Namibia, which helped them gain their independence from the South African Minority Apartheid Regime, thus most African leaders, with the exception to Botswana and Kenya’s opposition Prime Minister, are reluctant to pressure Mugabe to leave the office, because they feel like they still owe Mugabe. In the mean time, the majority of Zimbabweans are suffering. The recent report by BBC News states that about 1,564 people have died in Zimbabwe from Cholera. The country’s inflation is over 231,000,000%, healthcare facilities are non-functional, water in cities doesn’t run any more. Thus the majority of Zimbabweans are fleeing to neighboring South Africa. And what is Mugabe doing? He’s laughing at the West, calling them stupid, probably because they have become idle spectators. Read more at CNN.com.

3. The Somalia Pirates Crisis – welcome to the 8th century Mercantilism, when the Romans and the Greeks used to fight against the pirates, in almost the exact same area off of the coast of Somalia. Did you know that the insurance was invented by a band of British gentlemen in England as a result of ocean storms and pirates against their merchants’ ships to and from the New World? On the coast of present day Somalia, a band of pirates have been capitalizing on seizing foreign ships and cargos in return for hefty ransoms. It was reported that in 2008 alone, they profited over $100 million in ransom payment. What are the world powers; China, US, UK, Germany, etc, doing to end this crazy thing, pretty much nothing. They seem incapacitated by the Somali pirates.

4. Haiti – this is a country in the Western Hemisphere, but it is one of the poorest countries in the world. In November, a school in Haiti collapsed which caused at least 88 school kids to die, with another 150 injured. Not only that the school has caused devastation to Haiti, but many Haitians still live in poverty, and ravaged by all kinds of diseases.

5. The Israel-Palestine Crisis – about 320 Palestinians have died in just less than 3 days as a result of Israel’s all out war against Hamas. Since the recent signing of the Peace deal between Israel and Hamas government, Hamas has been firing rockets inside Israel, killing about 8 Israelis. In response, Israel has waged war against Palestine. Bush has become silent, while PE Obama has been a spectator. Read more at CNN.com.

In all, innocent civilians around the world are dying, children and women are hurting and endlessly suffering. The crisis in the Niger Delta, the Guinea’s recent military coup, coupled by the recent bombing of India’s hotels. Overall, President-elect Obama has a full plate waiting for him starting January 20th.

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The Most, Very Unique Invention Idea to Make Billions, Only for You?

In today’s competitive global economy, it’s all about finding your niche’. Bill Gates (Microsoft), Steve Jobs (Apple), Google (Page & Brin), and many other entrepreneurs have magnificently excelled at doing this very same thing, they found their niche’, which they have and continue to exploit while making tons of money. You can also find your niche and proprietarily develop it, market it globally, and make a fortune.

However, in this age, it’s nearly impossible for you to come up with a completely unique invention to capitalize on it. Because, nearly every unique invention that you could come up with, has already been invented by someone else.

Here is the best news for you, but only if you hurry and grab this idea now. This was an idea proposed by my Evolutionary Biology professor, Dr. Taylor, at the Ohio State University.

The idea is; most of us know that most amphibians, such as Frogs, lay their unshelled eggs in shallow water. Their mating process is unique too; the male frog grabs the female frog from behind, and then the female frog squirts out the eggs, lots of them, and all the eggs are sprouted in the water, no nest, just wrapped up in a clear jelly like liquid that keeps the eggs together.

Since their eggs remain alone, unguarded and unprotected, they usually become a meal for most other amphibians. The result is the decrease in their species growth, for such as frogs and other amphibians, which may eventually extinct, as their population continue to evaporate due to slow reproduction.

Now, imagine if you come up with a new invention, an invention that can help amphibians lay their eggs better, protect them, and eventually cause their reproduction to increase. Not only that you’ll make gazillions, but you will also help save most of the amphibian species.

Well, hurry up, and grab this new great invention idea. And when you successfully develop it, please don’t forget me.

What Every Organism Wants: Sexual Selection

Yes, the title is an indicative to capture your attention. And, since you’all seem so tired and perhaps stressed out, well, we are now in “officially” a recession. Perhaps, an economic depression is next, but not soon or may be never, I hope.

So, I wanted to arouse your attention for a minute and entertain your curiosity. The following may rather be out of the box discussion, but we may as well have an interesting discussion, other than focusing on the news about job loss, layoffs, rise of unemployment, etc. So here it is.

What Every Organism Wants: Sexual Selection

This week, in my biological evolution and speciation class, we had an interesting discussion, a lecture from my professor, Dr. Taylor at Ohio State University, focusing on sexual selection. The subject was about mate choice between males and females for reproduction.

The question that Dr. Taylor posed was: “If sexual preference was not biological but a choice, then how did you make your choice?”

Now my question is this; if you are a man, did you hop from one man to the next, different men each time, any number of times, and then to a woman, different women each time, any number of times, testing your sexual preference?

Likewise, if you are woman, did you also hop from one woman to the next, different women any number of times, and then to a man, different men each time, any number of times to test and decide your sexual preference?

So, how did you decide your sexual preference?

Wrisen, a New Facebook App to Help Users Remember Their Loved Ones

Wrisen

Within just a few days, I am going to launch my new social application on Facebook.

Wrisen is designed to enable social networking users to create, share, and browse profiles for all their passed loved ones, both humans and pets.

Users will post their loved ones’ photos and videos, personal and work history, talents and accomplishments, as well as eulogies, condolences, and memorial gifts to honor, remember, celebrate, and cherish their lives and memories, forever.

The version for MySpace, Hi5, Bebo, and Friendster will follow after I launch Wrisen on Facebook. See the Wrisen demo at Facebook now at this temporary link at http://apps.facebook.com/wrisenbook. When it’s launched, the permanent link will be announced on this blog.

President-Elect Obama Victory Speech Transcript

Transcript: ‘This is your victory,’ says Obama

Obama:

Hello, Chicago.

If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

It’s the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches in numbers this nation has never seen, by people who waited three hours and four hours, many for the first time in their lives, because they believed that this time must be different, that their voices could be that difference.

It’s the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, disabled and not disabled. Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been just a collection of individuals or a collection of red states and blue states.

We are, and always will be, the United States of America.

It’s the answer that led those who’ve been told for so long by so many to be cynical and fearful and doubtful about what we can achieve to put their hands on the arc of history and bend it once more toward the hope of a better day. Watch Obama’s speech in its entirety »

It’s been a long time coming, but tonight, because of what we did on this date in this election at this defining moment change has come to America.

A little bit earlier this evening, I received an extraordinarily gracious call from Sen. McCain.

Sen. McCain fought long and hard in this campaign. And he’s fought even longer and harder for the country that he loves. He has endured sacrifices for America that most of us cannot begin to imagine. We are better off for the service rendered by this brave and selfless leader.

I congratulate him; I congratulate Gov. Palin for all that they’ve achieved. And I look forward to working with them to renew this nation’s promise in the months ahead.

I want to thank my partner in this journey, a man who campaigned from his heart, and spoke for the men and women he grew up with on the streets of Scranton and rode with on the train home to Delaware, the vice president-elect of the United States, Joe Biden.

And I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last 16 years the rock of our family, the love of my life, the nation’s next first lady Michelle Obama.

Sasha and Malia I love you both more than you can imagine. And you have earned the new puppy that’s coming with us to the new White House.

And while she’s no longer with us, I know my grandmother’s watching, along with the family that made me who I am. I miss them tonight. I know that my debt to them is beyond measure.

To my sister Maya, my sister Alma, all my other brothers and sisters, thank you so much for all the support that you’ve given me. I am grateful to them.

And to my campaign manager, David Plouffe, the unsung hero of this campaign, who built the best — the best political campaign, I think, in the history of the United States of America.

To my chief strategist David Axelrod who’s been a partner with me every step of the way.

To the best campaign team ever assembled in the history of politics you made this happen, and I am forever grateful for what you’ve sacrificed to get it done.

But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to. It belongs to you. It belongs to you.

I was never the likeliest candidate for this office. We didn’t start with much money or many endorsements. Our campaign was not hatched in the halls of Washington. It began in the backyards of Des Moines and the living rooms of Concord and the front porches of Charleston. It was built by working men and women who dug into what little savings they had to give $5 and $10 and $20 to the cause.

It grew strength from the young people who rejected the myth of their generation’s apathy who left their homes and their families for jobs that offered little pay and less sleep.

It drew strength from the not-so-young people who braved the bitter cold and scorching heat to knock on doors of perfect strangers, and from the millions of Americans who volunteered and organized and proved that more than two centuries later a government of the people, by the people, and for the people has not perished from the Earth.

This is your victory.

And I know you didn’t do this just to win an election. And I know you didn’t do it for me.

You did it because you understand the enormity of the task that lies ahead. For even as we celebrate tonight, we know the challenges that tomorrow will bring are the greatest of our lifetime — two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century.

Even as we stand here tonight, we know there are brave Americans waking up in the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan to risk their lives for us.

There are mothers and fathers who will lie awake after the children fall asleep and wonder how they’ll make the mortgage or pay their doctors’ bills or save enough for their child’s college education.

There’s new energy to harness, new jobs to be created, new schools to build, and threats to meet, alliances to repair.

The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even in one term. But, America, I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there.

I promise you, we as a people will get there.

There will be setbacks and false starts. There are many who won’t agree with every decision or policy I make as president. And we know the government can’t solve every problem.

But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face. I will listen to you, especially when we disagree. And, above all, I will ask you to join in the work of remaking this nation, the only way it’s been done in America for 221 years — block by block, brick by brick, calloused hand by calloused hand.

What began 21 months ago in the depths of winter cannot end on this autumn night.

This victory alone is not the change we seek. It is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were.

It can’t happen without you, without a new spirit of service, a new spirit of sacrifice.

So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism, of responsibility, where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves but each other.

Let us remember that, if this financial crisis taught us anything, it’s that we cannot have a thriving Wall Street while Main Street suffers.

In this country, we rise or fall as one nation, as one people. Let’s resist the temptation to fall back on the same partisanship and pettiness and immaturity that has poisoned our politics for so long.

Let’s remember that it was a man from this state who first carried the banner of the Republican Party to the White House, a party founded on the values of self-reliance and individual liberty and national unity.

Those are values that we all share. And while the Democratic Party has won a great victory tonight, we do so with a measure of humility and determination to heal the divides that have held back our progress.

As Lincoln said to a nation far more divided than ours, we are not enemies but friends. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.

And to those Americans whose support I have yet to earn, I may not have won your vote tonight, but I hear your voices. I need your help. And I will be your president, too.

And to all those watching tonight from beyond our shores, from parliaments and palaces, to those who are huddled around radios in the forgotten corners of the world, our stories are singular, but our destiny is shared, and a new dawn of American leadership is at hand.

To those — to those who would tear the world down: We will defeat you. To those who seek peace and security: We support you. And to all those who have wondered if America’s beacon still burns as bright: Tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals: democracy, liberty, opportunity and unyielding hope.

That’s the true genius of America: that America can change. Our union can be perfected. What we’ve already achieved gives us hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that’s on my mind tonight’s about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She’s a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing: Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn’t vote for two reasons — because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

And tonight, I think about all that she’s seen throughout her century in America — the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can’t, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

At a time when women’s voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs, a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that “We Shall Overcome.” Yes we can.

A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination.

And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change.

Yes we can.

America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves — if our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?

This is our chance to answer that call. This is our moment.

This is our time, to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace; to reclaim the American dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth, that, out of many, we are one; that while we breathe, we hope. And where we are met with cynicism and doubts and those who tell us that we can’t, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people: Yes, we can.

Thank you. God bless you. And may God bless the United States of America.

Fast Forwad; What Would It Be Like, 4.6 Billion Years From Now?

A million years from now, or even a billion years from now, what and how is history going to be written about us, the humans? What’s the earth going to be like, let’s say 10 billion years from now?

Would there be anything left for our children’s children’s future generation? With all the things that are happening everywhere, from global warming, the depletion of ozone layer, the depletion of all the natural resources, from the water in the oceans, the plants, humans and animals, what would be left for the on-coming generation?

What and how is our history going to be written about, 500 million years from now? What’s our excuse for inexcusably messing things up for all the generations and generations to come? How are we going to explain to what we have done to Mother Nature, to everything we govern on this earth?

Some experts estimate the earth to have been formed about 4.6 billion years ago, and from about 250 million years ago, the dinosaurs and other earthly creatures roamed the earth, up to about 65 million years ago, the dinosaurs suffered a major catastrophic distinction, some believes that a large meteorite hit the earth, and that was the cause for a massive distinction to both earthly plants and animals.

About 150 thousand years ago, Adam and Eve were sanctioned to work in the Garden of Eden, and about 4,900 years ago, Moses freed the children of Israel from the bondage of Egypt, and about 2006 years ago, Jesus was born and crucified on the cross, and on the third day, He was risen.

It’s obvious that history is written for every event, whether it is about Abraham, Noah, the famine in Egypt or the freeing of all the Negro slaves in America about 400 years ago. Every year when history is written and all the major events, good or catastrophic, are all noted at the forefront of the “never-to-be-forgotten” page, let it be the crumbling of the Roman Empire, the British Empire, or the end of World War I, II, Cold War, Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the end of South African Apartheid, the overthrow of the Saddam Hussein Regime, or the current Israel-Lebanon War, in every catastrophic event, the lives of hundreds and thousands of people and animals are unreasonably, incomprehensibly wasted. When a 500lbs bomb is dropped anywhere, every living creature in that area is completely and perhaps forever destroyed, and radiation may stay there for years to come, which may cause incurable diseases and illness both to humans, plants, animals and or birds.

What must we be accountable for, we as humans who have, from the very beginning, have been naturally sanctioned to govern this earth and everything in it? What are we doing to help curb and or stop any future devastating global events that may cause the spread of diseases to our children’s future generation? What’s it that we are supposed to do on here, on this earth? Are we to help build or destroy it? What is it? When history is written 500 years from now, what will it be? What will it say? What are we doing to help make our planet, this planet, to be more habitable for our children’s children future generation? What and how will it be, this planet, planet earth?

Aren’t we supposed to be accountable for all that we do now, so that our children’s children’s future generation, anytime from now, whether it’s 20 years from now or 10 billion years from now, will they have playgrounds and backyards, soccer fields and clean ocean water to play and swim in them? What’s it? Why are we like this now? What do we need to change, all of us, whether it’s Africa, North and South America, Asia, Europe, or Australia? Are we really doing enough to help secure the future of our children’s future generation? Are we? Are you? What and how?

Who’s Killing All The Parents, Kids Ask?

Joseph is 26 years old and lives in Windhoek, Namibia. At the age of 21, he has unexpectedly become the father and mother of his 4 young brothers and 2 sisters, when his most loving mother, Hileni, a school teacher and city councilwoman, the only provider of the family, unexpectedly died from the HIV disease.

Their father, Samuels had died a year before. The youngest child at the time was just less than 4 years old. Fortunately, when Hileni passed away, Joseph has already graduated from high school, and he was planning on going to college, but he could never go, as he had to find a job to support his young brothers and sisters.

Joseph has a brother, Fritz, who is 23 years old and is defying the gravity of their hardship by going to college. He wants to go to Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California, and then transfer to UCLA to complete his degree education, so he can one day find a good paying job to help his brothers and sisters.

And by the time Fritz completes his degree education, Joseph would be in his 30s, but Joseph also plans on going to college as soon as Fritz finishes and gets a job to help take over the family load. However for Fritz to find the money he needs to pay for his tuition and fees at SMC is another dream that needs to come true for him, which is almost impossible, his mother and father have died and they have no relatives who can afford to send them to college. With stringent bureaucracy, who and how can anyone even ask the government to help fund their education?

In Columbus, Ohio, Timothy is 20 years old and a second year student at the Ohio State University majoring in Computer Science Engineering. His mother was gunned down in a drug related accident when Timothy was just three years old. His father has had unfortunately fallen a victim of drugs and alcohol since Timothy was little, so he has never been in any place to help raise Timothy and his young brother.

Luckily, Timothy has an aunt who helped raise him and his young brother. And at the age of 14, Timothy was forced to find a job in Richmond, Virginia, at a local McDonald’s restaurant, but because he was just too young to work, he had to lie on his job application that he was in fact 16 years old. He had to work in order to support himself and his young brother.

Timothy calls himself the ‘definition’, the definition of overcoming hardship, struggle, and growing up without any proper supervision and parental love. His favorite word is ‘focus’.

Whenever you talk to Timothy, you would hear that word ‘focus’ lamenting in his tone more than a dozen times. It’s his vocabulary and his reminder to staying focus on what he has always wanted to do, reaching his goal and realizing his potential. He has already defied that by finishing high school no matter what he had faced in his early years of life and by enrolling in college to achieving his dream.

Timothy works more hours each week, more than the hours he needs to study. He has to work in order to pay for his rent and housing expenses, for him and his young brother. However, he’s at least fortunate that he has financial aid and student loans from the U.S. Department of Education to pay for his tuition and fees at the Ohio State University.

Zanelle is a 16 years old from Soweto, South Africa. She has three sisters and one brother. Her father died of AIDS when she was just 12 years old and her mother died of the same disease when she was 14 years old. At 16, Zanelle is the mother and father, provider and bread-winner of her siblings. She dropped out of school in order to work as a brick layer in order to earn money to help and support her brother and sisters.

Her relatives, aunts and uncles have also died of AIDS and the few remaining relatives are also HIV positive. Her 79 years old grandmother is the only one left to help out at home, but what can she really do at her age, except to look after the kids when Zanelle goes to work?

In the rural areas of India, there’s a place well known as Destiny Village (http://www.destinyvillage.org), with children, mostly orphanage, some of whom were abandoned by their families. This same Destiny Village has also been setup in Haiti to help house the same type of children. These two houses have been generously setup and sponsored by members of The Potter’s House Church of God (http://www.pottershouse.org) in Columbus, Ohio, under the leadership of the anointed, Pastor Tim Oldfield.

Some or all of the children in the Destiny Village housing projects, if it was not for the Potter’s House initiatives to help them by providing them with adequate housing, food, and education, God only knows where these kids would be today, most of them would probably be dead, or staying homeless as they once were prior to the Potter’s House initiatives to help them.

In the rural areas of Lundazi in Zambia, Mathias Zimba, director of Rising Fountain Development Program (http://www.risingfountains.org) is trying his utmost best to help families; grandparents, children and HIV positive victims in the whole rural area of Lundazi to have access to medical facilities and education.

Lundazi is one of the largest Districts in the Eastern part of Zambia, with a total population of 296,560, of which the majority live in the Lundazi rural area, while only a small part of the population lives in the city district.

Most of the population of the Lundazi area is HIV positive for those who are still living, while the majority of the parents have died of HIV and only the grandparents are left to raise and look after the orphanage kids.

When only the grandparents, most of them are in their late 70s and 80s, they cannot really provide the children with the care they need and cannot also help them with their educational work, as what normal parents would do. Because most of the grandparents were born during the colonialism and did not have opportunity to get an education. Thus now, the cycle of illiteracy continuous to repeat itself.

“There are a number of policies that have been put in place and slowly being implemented by the Zambian government, though the challenge is that, most of these policies are really only effective in urban areas and trickle at a snail rate into rural areas” said Zimba.

Among some of the notable policies in place by the Zambian government include:

Education Policy – free education for all at Basic Education. However the challenge is that despite being a policy, school authorities still charge a fee ‘user fee’ for students to pay.

“This money is used for operational costs for the school to cover the deficit they have from their lean budgets. Now, in rural areas, where on earth can a family with almost no income meet these costs? The end solution is that in rural areas, some children, particularly girls are left out from school and are forced into early marriages and so forth” said Mr. Zimba.

Healthcare Policy – free HIV/AIDS drugs to people infected with the disease. Zimba said that this is a wonderful policy to allow people who are HIV positive to have access to life saving drugs.

“The challenge is that most of the rural area clinics are centralized near the urban areas and sick people need to walk by foot almost 120 km (about 75 miles) to access the help they desperately need. There is no reliable transportation, despite the community efforts to put up good feeder roads and in the end; people are just dying in the rural areas” said Mr. Zimba.

“What are the consequences? HIV is increasingly being spread throughout the country and grandmothers are now taking over, looking after their grandchildren as due to the death of their own children” Said Zimba.

Agricultural Policy – a good policy has been put in place relating to marketing of farm produce to allow local farmers to sell their produce through a liberalized system in order to earn a few monies to support their families.

“The challenge is that despite all of these wonderful policies for Agriculture, in rural areas, we are only seeing a few “unscrupulous” traders who come and rip off poor farmers and buy their produce at extremely low prices” states Zimba.

“Our main goal really is to help children and women in these areas of Zambia to have a future and fulfill their dreams. But to do that, we need advocacy on our work so that people who have power and resources can help us meet our objectives. We need to help children to have food on the table, medical, clothes and most importantly, a good health system” cries Zimba.

One of the projects that are currently helping and working with the Rising Fountain Development Program is The Pencil Project (http://www.thepencilproject.com) led by Maria Vick and is based in South Carolina, USA.

“I lived in Swaziland as a child and was able to witness poverty firsthand. As you know, a trip to Africa will change anyone forever. I was always struck by the joy and gratefulness that I found in the African people despite the fact that so many had so little” states Mrs. Vick.

“As I’ve matured, now at 36 years of age, I have come to believe that education is the only real way out of poverty and that all the world’s children should have access to the tools they need. A pack of one dozen pencils, something that people in well developed countries take for granted, could help 12 children” states Mrs. Vick.

“In just a short time, my project has gotten a pencil into the hands of over 10,000 needy children. The pencil, though a simple thing, symbolizes education and the promise that I would like every child to feel” Says Maria Vick.

Mrs. Vick says that she acts as a ‘matchmaker’ between a donor school and a needy school. People come to her website who are looking for an easy way to help children in need. The donor school will collect pencils and then ship them to the needy school that she has found for them. And that’s how her organization started working with Mathias Zimba and the Rising Fountain Development Program.

“I believe that Mathias first contacted me, I can’t remember, and we sent an initial shipment of pencils to his students. He responded so beautifully by sending me many photos of the children receiving the pencils. They were so grateful! Their photo is on my homepage. Simon, I cried for days” sadly states Mrs. Vick.

“I have helped numerous needy schools around the world since my project’s inception but something about this program, about Mathias Zimba, and about these students have touched me as they have touched you. I have pledged to personally collect supplies for their school and am currently sending two additional parcels a month of paper, books, etc. all on my own dime” cries Mrs. Vick.

“The children have nothing, no shoes, and no blankets, nothing…and yet they try to come to school every day with a smile on their face. I don’t believe that the UN or any government for that matter is doing much to help the world’s children. There are children that are forgotten all over the world. Even in my state of South Carolina, we have school districts that are terribly underfunded (http://www.corridorofshame.com). I personally feel that we cannot wait for the government to come through for these children. They need materials now and every day that goes by is another lost opportunity for them. I won’t wait for the government. I just want to put the materials into their hands” states Mrs. Vick.

“As far as the children left homeless by AIDS, it is devastating. But it’s all part of a much larger problem which comes back to education. Knowledge is power, Simon. I know that you understand that. It is often difficult to recruit people to help in these efforts if they have never been to Africa or have only ‘seen’ poverty through the television screen in their warm, comfortable living room. That’s why I am focused on the younger generation—the children who email me every day to help. They are so eager and so willing to help build their generation. It encourages me that my small idea has blossomed into something that I never could have imagined” states Mrs. Vick.

Mathias Zimba states that his organization’s main goal is to help children and women in these areas of Zambia to have a future and fulfill their dreams. “But to do that, we need advocacy for our work so that people who have power and resources can help us meet our objectives. We need to help children to have food on the table, medical, clothes and most importantly, a good health system” cries Mr. Zimba.

“Our current urgent need is to allocate funding to help pay teachers at our rural community school, which is US$150 a month in salary for a qualified teacher to work in the rural areas. We need to recruit two qualified teachers to help out. Currently we are only working with volunteers and there is no consistency” Says Zimba.

“Rehabilitation of water wells. Water borne diseases thrive in the rural areas and we want to help them rehabilitate and maintain by forming a water committee. It costs around US$400 to rehabilitate a well and we need to help them rehab approximately 5 wells that will serve 300 members” states Mathias Zimba.

The most important problem currently facing Mr. Zimba is to find someone who may be willing to help them through donations or grants to buy a vehicle that they can use for an ambulance which will help people in his communities be able to go to healthcare clinics and receive medical care they so desperately need.

Most sick people when they walk the long distance to go to collect their daily HIV dozes of medicines, most of them don’t even make it back. They die on the way to the clinics because it takes them up to 3 days to get there by foot.

And when they don’t return home, the kids ask, who’s taking away all of our parents? Who’s killing our parents? Doesn’t God love us anymore? Why has God forsaken us?

The grandparents have no answers to any of these questions, they simply look at the kids and tell them that it’s God’s will that He’s taking them away.

Some of the people, who can afford, use donkey carts to go to and back from the clinics. Zimba believes that finding someone to help them with a van that they can use as a vehicle will tremendously help them solve one of the most critical problems of getting the sick to the healthcare.

The week of October 16, 2007, Jennie who is one of the volunteers from Ireland who arrived last week to volunteer at the Rising Fountain Development Program, brought Mr. Zimba and his team an award, presented to them by Mayor Edwin Stevenson of Limavady City, Ireland, who awarded Mathias Zimba and his group as a recognition for their outstanding community work.

“This is great news for all of us. It’s a great daily challenge being faced with so many problems in our community, and this award encourages us to work relentlessly and help people in our community as much as we can. We just need help, more resources and supports in order to enable us to carry on with our tasks, even a small contribution can help make a difference in a big way” states Mr. Zimba.

In the near future, Mathias Zimba and his organization want to initiate a cooperative program to help farmers sell their produce at economic prices and raise income for their savings.

“There are many other organizations such as WVI, Global Fund, and others that are working for the same cause in Zambia, but most of these organizations are centralized in large cities and towns and don’t really reach people in rural areas” says Mr. Zimba.

There are many Josephs, Timothys, Zanelles, Destiny Villages and Lundazis out there, all around us, everywhere in the world, and the question is, what are you doing to help out?

If you would like to learn more or find out how you can help Mathias Zimba and his organization, The Rising Fountain Development Program, please visit their web site at http://www.risingfountains.org.

About Simon Kapenda

Simon Kapenda is a volunteer author of this article. He’s founder of Tip-Mart, Inc., (http://www.tipmart.com) and developer of RentersQ (http://www.rentersq.com) and Gatepedia (http://www.gatepedia.com). He’s a student in Economics at the Ohio State University, a self-declared serial entrepreneur, speaker, and philanthropist, and an avid amateur blogger at his blog at http://www.princesimon.com.