Saddened by the Sudden Death of My Friend, Lucky Dube

Today, the whole world is greatly saddened by the tragic loss and sudden death of one of the world’s greatest musicians ever, Lucky Dube (www.luckydubemusic.com).

Lucky Dube, 43, was shot last night by three hijackers in Rosettenville, just south of downtown Johannesburg, as he was dropping off his teenage son at his brother’s house. Check out some of his music at Free.Napster.

As a sound engineer, I had the honor and pleasure of spending a great deal of time with Lucky Dube in the 90’s, working and doing live sound for his concerts in Namibia and Europe. I grew up listening to Lucky Dube’s music in Namibia; he’s one of my favorite artists of all time.

But before I met him in person, I used to think that he was like most other Rastafarians; smoking Marijuana and drinking alcohol, but to my surprise, the first time I met him in around October 1991, if my memory serves me right, at Katutura Stadium, where he was performing and I was assisting with the Front House sound.

During the break, we all left the stage and went inside the room, underneath the stage to get some snacks and rest up a bit, and one of the promoters asked him if he smoked Marijuana and drank alcohol, and Lucky Dube softly and gently answered him that he never smoked Marijuana or cigarettes and he didn’t drink alcohol.

But by the way he looks, like a Rastafarian; anyone who didn’t personally know him would undoubtedly conclude that he smoked Marijuana and drank alcohol and worships the Rastafarian religion, but he said that he didn’t believe in smoking or drinking and that he was a Christian and strongly believe in Jesus Christ, son of God.

I was sitting there starring at him with my eyes wide open; I couldn’t believe what I was hearing, because I have always thought that Lucky Dube was like every other Rastafarian such as Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, and others, but not Lucky Dube.

I usually really didn’t care too much about who I was working with at any time, but I instantly liked Lucky Dube even more, not only as an artist, but as a person and a friend. He was real in his music. Most artists sing about things just for the sake of selling records, but Lucky Dube believed in what he sang.

He was a true comrade; very kind, generous in terms of just talking, giving advices, and helping others, and all he talked about was about how one can make it in life, for anyone to take care of one’s personal responsibilities, family value, friendship and good citizenship.

After that concert, we ended up being good friends, and although I haven’t seen or talked to him in years, I’ve always thought that may be one day, we would be doing some stuff, like business, together, but I guess I had forgotten that time was not on our side.

Now he’s gone, gone but not forever. His physical being might have gone away from this earth, but his spirit and music will always live forever. Lucky Dube was one of the nicest and kindest persons I have ever met and known.

Let your spirit and music live forever, Lucky Dube. Let Jah live!

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8 thoughts on “Saddened by the Sudden Death of My Friend, Lucky Dube

  1. Simon, I have learned even more from your post about the life of Lucky Dube. So sad to note that the freedom that he firmly campaigned for has brought “other freedoms” in RSA one of which (crime) has eventually led to his own demise. The RSA government must stop this crime thing NOW!

  2. What a loss to the whole world. Lucky Dube spent out his life for others and he loved the truth which many people don’t like. He has died for the truth and the truth will console him. He is no more but not forever.

    He has been eliminated from this earth, but his spirit and music will always live among us forever.

    Lucky Dube was my number one musician. Missing you Dube and I know one day we shall meet. Rest in peace though it is difficult to imagine a world without you.

    Let your spirit and music live forever, Lucky Dube. Let Jah live!

    Given Mutinta
    University of Zambia

  3. Greetings Simon,

    Give thanks for the remembrance of brother Lucky Dube. Please though, overstand that contextualizing the Rastafari faith as one that has adherents that simply drink alcohol and smoke marijuana is incorrect and does not serve your readers well. As a Rastafarian, I am here to state that we are African freedom fighters first and foremost…who stand in solidarity with the teachings of the Rt Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Haile I Selassie Jah Rastafari and other African liberators who lit the torch of African liberation at home and abroad.

    http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=viewImage&friendID=66410800&albumID=0&imageID=1771752

  4. Brian, thanks for the comment. As stated, my statement does not claim that “all of the Rastafarians”, but it states that “most other Rastafarians”; as quoted; “I used to think that he was like most other Rastafarians…”. This contextualizing is based on what I know about “most of the Rastafarians”, not all, who I have personally met, but as my quote indicates, I didn’t say “all”. However, I am glad to learn more about the subject matter and I respect your stance. Please, stay in touch! If you have a chance, check out this link; http://www.swagga.com/ganga.htm

  5. Simon,thanks for putting the death of a rastafarian icon in such detailed perspective.
    I was still at High School ,Khorixas way back in the 80’s and can vividly still remember the song
    “Rastas never die”. To date we will continue to pray
    for Lucky Dube ‘s soul to rest in eternal peace.
    surely he was a rasta icon like none other.
    If u get time, just play the above track.It’s more than words can ever say.

  6. Am very disgursted with what those nonesence that took away my favourite artist eva. most of my life i hv been inspired by lucky dube. what am i going to do without my inspiration. all i can say is they need to be taught a lesson, eventhough it won;t bring my man back!! REST IN PEACE DEAR. will continue loving you and promoting you until the end.

  7. By the way, most Rastas actually abstain from alcohol. Consumption of alcohol is generally looked down upon in their culture.

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